From left: OU Outreach Assistant Vice President Shad Satterthwhaite, Advanced Programs Assistant Director for North America Lauren Mullica, U.S. Army Sergeant Major Daniel A. Dailey, CLS Recruitment Specialist Kasey Moore, Advanced Programs Assistant Director for Europe Jaime N. Harmon

Military Ed Conference Promotes Training-Education Exchange

From left:  OU Outreach Assistant Vice President Shad Satterthwaite, Advanced Programs Assistant Director for North America Lauren Mullica, U.S. Army Sergeant Major Daniel A. Dailey,  CLS Recruitment Specialist Kasey Moore, Advanced Programs Assistant Director for Europe Jaime N. Harmon

This story was adapted from Deah Caldwell’s feature on the CLS Insight blog.

Several CLS staff members attended the annual conference of the Council of College and Military Educators (CCME) held this February in San Antonio, TX. These included James Pappas, dean and vice president for Outreach; Martha Banz, associate dean; and Kasey Moore, recruitment specialist. One of the keynote sessions they attended featured Sergeant Major Daniel A. Dailey.

The Sergeant Major (SMA) of the U.S. Army, a most senior-enlisted member of that service, acts as a spokesperson on behalf of central issues regarding personnel. Sergeant Major Dailey discussed several education initiatives that could benefit U.S. military students.

Daily supports legislation to allow soldiers to utilize Tuition Assistance (TA) to pay for civilian-equivalent credentials. Essentially, this means the army provides a transitional way for service members to transfer their Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) training and skills toward academic and/or vocational credits. Stressing the importance for educational institutions to review and consider allowing prior military training to count toward college credit, he cited examples of civilian students using internships at local agencies and businesses to gain credit toward their degrees.

“We are privileged to play a role in making advanced degrees for the men and women of the armed forces,” Pappas said. “And we strive to make these degrees as accessible as possible. Our military personnel acquire considerable skills in their service to our country and that should be recognized.”

Currently, the military and law enforcement are two agencies that can apply job training experience toward transcript credit. The army is also exploring ways to help apply military skills toward civilian institutions.

One such experiment is a new program called Army University, meant to “improve learning, net more college credits and produce universal transcripts that outline every soldier’s training, education, and experience,” according to Army Times. Universal transcripts will serve as a tool to convert expertise acquired during enlistment into the civilian world.

According to Dailey, the goal for Army University “is to become a degree-producing agency while maximizing the amount of credit our soldiers get for the education they receive.”

Dailey’s educational initiatives are particularly central to CLS’s interests because the college serves a substantial military demographic.